How to Potty Train a Stubborn Toddler

How To Potty Train a Stubborn Toddler: A Helpful Guide, Tips and Resources

If you’re struggling to potty train your toddler, don’t worry, you’re not alone. It can be a frustrating process, but there are things you can do to make it go more smoothly. In this article, we’ll share some tips on how to potty train a stubborn toddler, including when to start and how to make it fun for them. With a little patience and perseverance, you’ll be successful in no time.

The best way to potty train a resistant child is to ensure that you start potty training when they are ready. This usually happens between 18 – 24 months old, but it can vary from child to child. Once they are ready, make sure they use the potty regularly, even if they don’t have to go and be consistent in your training. This will help them get used to the idea and make it a regular part of their routine, like second nature. Praise them highly whenever they use the potty, even if it’s just a little bit and never punish them for accidents. Finally, be patient. It can take some time for toddlers to get the hang of things, but eventually, they’ll get there.

For more information and tips on how to potty train a stubborn toddler, read on and we’ll discuss some important things you’ll need to know. 

How to Potty Train a Stubborn Toddler?

Potty training a child that doesn’t seem interested in the potty can be a frustrating experience for both parents and toddlers. However, there are some things you can do to make the process go more smoothly. 

First, it’s important to have realistic expectations. Potty training takes time and patience. Know that there will be accidents along the way. Don’t get frustrated if there are accidents, just clean up the mess and move on.

Second, create a positive potty-training environment so your toddler feels comfortable and relaxed when using the toilet. Make sure that you have a potty seat that is the right size for your child. They should be able to sit comfortably on the seat without feeling cramped. 

Third, use encouragement and positive reinforcement. When your toddler uses the toilet successfully, praise him or her lavishly. Make it fun. Potty training doesn’t have to be a chore. Try using stickers or other rewards to make it more fun for your child.

Fourth, be consistent. Consistency is key when potty training. Whether you’re using a specific method or just going with the flow, it’s important to be consistent with your approach. 

Finally, be prepared to persevere. Potty training can take some time, so it’s important to be patient with your child, but if you stay positive and consistent, you’ll eventually succeed.

Top 10 tips for Potty Training Success

  • Choose the right time to start. Potty training should only be started when both you and your child are ready.
  • Get the right supplies. Make sure you have a potty seat that is comfortable for your child, that they can easily use.
  • Use positive reinforcement. Whenever your child uses the potty successfully, praise them and make it fun for them.
  • Be consistent. It’s important to be consistent with your potty training approach in order to avoid confusion for your child.
  • Avoid punishment. Never punish your child for having an accident. This will only make them more resistant to using the potty.
  • Encourage your child to use the potty regularly. Set regular times for your child to try using the potty so that they get into the habit.
  • Be prepared for setbacks. There will be times when your child has accidents or isn’t interested in using the potty. Just stay positive and keep trying.
  • Reward your child’s progress. As your child gets better at using the potty, reward their progress with stickers or other treats.
  • Have patience. Potty training takes time and patience, so don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t happen overnight.
  • Get help if you need it. If you’re having trouble potty training your child, seek out the advice of an experienced friend, family member, or professional.

Signs That A Toddler Is Ready To Start Potty Training

Some common signs that a toddler is ready to start potty training include: expressing interest in using the toilet, staying dry for longer periods of time, being able to follow simple instructions, being able to dress/undress themselves, staying dry throughout the night, and expressing discomfort when they’ve used their diaper or pull-up. 

If your child is exhibiting these signs, then it may be time to start potty training. However, every child is different, so potty training should only be started when both you and your child are ready.

How To Start Potty Training

If you’re feeling confident and prepared to start potty training, there are a few things you’ll need to do in order to get started. First, you’ll need to gather the necessary supplies, like a potty seat and some clean, comfortable clothes for your child to wear. Next, you’ll need to choose a method. There are a variety of different potty training methods out there, so do some research and decide which one will work best for you and your child. 

Once you’ve chosen a method, it’s time to start potty training! Be patient, consistent, and positive, and you’ll eventually succeed. For detailed information on how to potty train your toddler, check out our post INSERT TITLE!

How To Make the Potty Training Process Fun For Your Toddler

One way to make the potty training process more fun for your toddler is to use stickers or other reward systems as a way to encourage them. Whenever they use the potty successfully, give them a sticker or let them choose a special treat. You can also dance, sing jump around, have ice cream together or let them pick a toy from a bag. This will help them to associate using the potty with something fun and positive, making it more likely that they’ll want to do it often. 

You may even consider making a game out of it by seeing how long they can go without having an accident and using pretend play scenarios from potty books or toys. This will help them to focus on the mission: using the potty, without getting distracted and make it more fun for them.

8 Common Reasons A Toddler Won’t Use The Potty

  • They’re not ready yet: Some toddlers just aren’t ready to start potty training, no matter how much you try. They may not have the necessary motor skills or be emotionally mature enough to understand and cooperate with the process.
  • They’re afraid of the potty: Many toddlers are afraid of the potty, especially if they’ve seen someone else use it and it looked scary or uncomfortable.
  • They don’t like the sensation of using the potty: Some toddlers don’t like the sensation of peeing or pooping in the potty. This can be because they’re used to the feeling of a diaper or pull-up, or because they don’t like the sound or sensation of peeing or pooping in the potty.
  • They’re resistant to change: Many toddlers are resistant to change, and starting potty training is a big change. They may not be ready to give up diapers or pull-ups, even if they’re interested in using the potty.
  • They’re not motivated: Some toddlers just aren’t motivated to use the potty. They may not be interested in the rewards you’re offering, or they may not care if they have accidents.
  • They’re distracted: Many toddlers get distracted easily, and this can make it hard for them to focus on using the potty. If there’s something else they’d rather be doing, they may not be able to pay attention long enough to use the potty successfully.
  • They’re experiencing stress or anxiety: Stress and anxiety can make it hard for anyone to focus, and toddlers are no exception. If your child is going through a stressful time, it may be difficult for them to use the potty.
  • They have a medical condition: Some medical conditions can make it difficult or impossible for a child to use the potty. If you suspect your child may have a medical condition, talk to your doctor.

Trouble-Shooting Common Potty-Training Problems

If you’re having trouble figuring out how to potty training a stubborn toddler child, here are a few tips to help you troubleshoot common problems.

Problem: Your child has accidents frequently.

Solution: First, make sure that you’re being consistent with your potty training approach. If you’re not consistent, it will only confuse your child. Second, try setting regular times for your child to use the potty. This will help them get into the habit of using it regularly. Finally, be prepared for setbacks and don’t get discouraged if your child has an accident.

Problem: Your child refuses to use the potty.

Solution: First, make sure that you’ve chosen a potty training method that’s appropriate for your child. If you’re not sure, seek out the advice of an experienced friend or family member. Second, try being positive and encouraging when your child does use the potty, even if it’s just a little bit. Finally, have patience and remember that potty training takes time.

Problem: Your child is scared of the potty.

Solution: First, try to make the potty a positive experience for your child. Encourage them with praise and rewards when they use it. You may also want to try using a potty training seat that’s designed to look like a regular toilet seat. This can help ease your child’s fears. Finally, be patient and keep trying. With time and patience, your child will eventually overcome their fear.

Problem: Your child had potty-training success and regressed.

Solution: First, try to figure out what may have caused the regression. Did something happen that made your child scared or uncomfortable? If so, try to address the issue and help your child overcome their fear. Second, go back to basics and start from the beginning. This may mean going back to using a potty training seat or diapers for a while. Checkout out INSERT TITLE for more information on potty training regression. 

Problem: Your child can’t communicate effectively to you when they need to use the potty.

Solution:  First, pay attention to your child’s cues. Does he or she start squirming or holding him or herself? If so, that may be a sign that they need to use the potty. Second, find ways to help your child communicate with you through words, signs, or pictures. This can be helpful in situations when your child can’t communicate verbally. Finally, have patience and keep trying. With time and practice, your child will eventually be able to communicate their needs to you.

The bottom line:

There are many solutions and helpful resources that can make potty training  easier. Start by figuring out the underlying problem, then research a solution. These are just a few tips to help you troubleshoot common potty training problems. 

Potty training can be a challenging experience, but it’s important to stay positive and consistent. With time and patience, your child will eventually be potty trained!

What To Do If Potty Training Isn’t Going Well

If you’re still having trouble potty training your child, don’t despair. Just stay positive and keep trying. You may also want to seek out the advice of an experienced friend, family member, or professional. Sometimes a fresh perspective can be helpful. In addition, there are a number of potty training resources available online and in stores that can be helpful. 

Potty Training Success Stories.

When it comes to potty training, every child is different. Some children take to it quickly and easily, while others need a bit more time and patience. But eventually, with consistency and positive reinforcement, all children will learn how to use the potty effectively. 

Here are some stories of potty-training success from real parents:

“I potty trained my son in just two weeks! I was so proud of him. We used a reward system, where he got a sticker for every-time he used the potty. He was motivated by the stickers, and it didn’t take long before he was using the potty on his own.”

Successful Potty Training Parent

“My daughter was a bit more stubborn about potty training. It took a few months of persistence, but eventually she got the hang of it. We would have regular ‘potty times’ throughout the day, and I would praise her whenever she used the potty. She slowly started to use it more on her own, and eventually she was potty trained.”

Stubborn Toddler Potty Training Parent

“It took a bit longer for my son to be potty trained. He was about 3 1/2 years old when he finally got the hang of it. We used a lot of positive reinforcement, and we made it fun for him by using stickers and small toys as rewards. Eventually, he got the hang of it and he’s been using the potty ever since.”

Dedicated Potty Training Parent

I myself have had success in potty training my 2-year-old son, Noah, and we also experienced and overcame regression. Many parents have stories in common, but the key is to be consistent and patient. Hopefully these success stories give you some inspiration!

The Mom Resource

Final Remarks

When it comes to potty training, every child is different. Some children take to it quickly and easily, while others need a bit more time and patience. Don’t get discouraged if it takes a bit longer for your child to learn. Just stay positive and keep trying! Eventually, with consistency and positive reinforcement, all children will learn how to use the potty effectively.  

Additional Resources

If you’re having trouble potty training your child, there are a number of resources available to help you. Here are a few:

When To Start Potty-Training a Toddler: Age Guidelines for Girls, Boys, and Late Starters

The Potty Training Answer Book: Practical Answers to the Top 200 Questions Parents Ask (Parenting Answer Book)

Oh Crap! Potty Training: Everything Modern Parents Need to Know to Do It Once and Do It Right

Potty Training in 3 Days: The Step-by-Step Plan for a Clean Break from Dirty Diapers

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Shopping Cart