When to start potty training a toddler

When To Start Potty-Training a Toddler: Age Guidelines for Girls, Boys, and Late Starters

Potty training is a process that can seem daunting to parents, but it doesn’t have to be! There are various potty training age guidelines out there, and it can be confusing trying to figure out when to start potty training a toddler. In this blog post, we will break down when to start potty-training a toddler, including age guidelines for girls, boys, and late starters. 

The recommended age to begin potty training a toddler is between 18 and 24 months. Girls are typically ready to begin potty training earlier than boys. On average, most toddlers are potty trained between 33 and 36 months.  Late starters (children who are potty trained after 36 months) are not uncommon, and there is no need to worry if your child falls into this category. There are various potty training methods out there, so it is important to find one that works best for you and your child.

Keep reading for more potty training tips on when to start potty-training a toddler, for girls, boys, and late starters!

When to Start Potty-Training a Toddler

The ideal age to begin potty training is around 24 months old. This is when most children are developmentally ready to start potty training. Boys are typically potty trained a little later than girls, but potty training a boy doesn’t have to be more difficult. On average, most toddlers are potty trained between 33 and 36 months. 

There are a few general guidelines that can be helpful in helping you decide what age should you begin potty training, but the most important thing is readiness. It’s important to make sure that your child is physically and verbally ready for potty training. This typically includes being able to walk and sit independently, as well as having some basic language skills. Before starting, try looking for signs that your child is interested in using the potty, such as wanting to wear underwear or showing a dislike for soiled

Signs that your child is ready to begin potty training

  • Asking to be changed after using their diaper or pull up
  • Showing interest in the potty chair or toilet
  • Being able to follow simple instructions
  • Staying dry for at least two hours at a time, or overnight
  • Having a regular potty schedule, or going at similar times each day
  • Showing a dislike for soiled diapers or pull ups
  • Ability to dress/undress themselves
  • Clear communication skills

If your child is showing one or more of these potty-training readiness signs, they may be ready to start potty training!

When to Start Potty-Training a Toddler Girl?

The ideal potty training age for girls is 18-24 months old. Girls are typically potty trained a little earlier than boys, with most girls being potty trained by 33 months.

When potty training a girl, it is important to start early and be patient. Toddler girls typically have a short attention span, especially if you begin as early as 18 months, so potty training sessions should be short and sweet. It is also important to praise your daughter for her successes, even if they are small. Use fun stickers,  potty charts, or potty training books to make the process more enjoyable for her.

When to Start Potty-Training a Toddler Boy

The ideal potty training age for boys is 24 months old. Boys are typically potty trained a little later than girls, with most boys being potty trained by 36 months.

When potty training a boy, it is important to be patient and keep in mind that boys may typically need a little more time than girls. Boys also tend to have stronger muscle control, so they may be less likely to have accidents, but also able to hold their bladder for longer periods of time. This means they can be use this as a way to be resistant. 

Additionally, boys typically don’t like to stop playing to go potty, so it is important to have a potty chair or potty seat available at all times. Boys may also benefit from choosing their potty training pants, which can help them feel like they are “in control” of their potty training.

The Difference between potty training girls versus potty training boys.

While potty training girls and potty training boys may have some similarities, there are also a few key differences. Some key differences include:

  • Girls can be potty trained a little earlier than boys, with most girls being potty trained by 33 months. Boys are typically potty trained a little later, with most boys being potty trained by 36 months.
  • Boys have stronger muscle control, so they may be less likely to have accidents, but also able to hold their bladder for longer periods of time.
  • Girls love attention, high praise and lavish rewards.
  • Boys may resist potty training because they don’t want to interrupt their playtime.
  • Girls may have accidents due to their shorter attention span and weaker muscle control.
  • Boys may be more resistant to potty training because they can hold their bladder for longer periods of time.
  • Girls typically have regular potty schedules and go at similar times each day.
  • Boys may not have regular potty schedules and may go at different times each day.
  • Girls typically have one stream of urine while boys may have two streams of urine.
  • Boys typically need to aim their penis down in order to avoid making a mess, while girls do not need to aim.
  • Girls typically sit down to potty while boys have the option to stand up to potty.
  • Boys may benefit from feeling like they are “in control” of their potty training.

What Age Is Considered “Too Late” To Start Potty Training?

There is no such thing as potty training “too late.” Late starters (children who are potty trained after 36 months) are not uncommon. If your child is a late starter and isn’t potty trained after 36 months, don’t worry! This is not uncommon.

Most experts agree that potty training should be completed by age three. After age three, potty training can become more difficult and may take longer to complete. The latest recommended age to start potty training is four years old. However, some children may not be ready to start potty training until they are five years old or older. If your child shows no interest in potty training by age four, it is important to consult with your pediatrician to rule out any underlying medical conditions that may be causing the delay.

Additionally, potty training after age four may be more difficult, as your child will likely be set in their ways and resistant to change. However, it is still possible to potty train a child after age four with patience and consistency. If you are potty training a late starter, it is important to keep in mind that accidents are common and to be expected. Be patient, consistent, and use positive reinforcement to encourage your child through the potty training process.

What is Potty Training Regression

Potty training regression is when a child who has already been potty trained begins to have accidents or refuses to use the potty. 

There are a few common reasons for potty training regression, including:

  • A change in routine: If there has been a recent change in your child’s routine (a new baby, starting daycare, a move, etc.), this can be disruptive and cause potty training regression.
  • Potty training too early: If potty training is started before your child is ready, this can lead to potty training regression.
  • Potty training too late: If potty training is started after your child is four years old, this can also lead to potty training regression.
  • Stress: If your child is experiencing stress from a major life event (such as starting school, a divorce, or the birth of a new baby), this can trigger potty training regression.
  • Developmental delays: If your child has a developmental delay or other underlying medical condition, this can cause potty training regression.
  • Poor potty training experiences: If your child had negative potty training experiences (such as being forced to potty train before they were ready), this can cause potty training regression.

If you think your child may be experiencing potty training regression, the best thing to do is assess the situation and try to identify the cause of the regression. Try to identify any potential stressors in your child’s life that may be triggering the regression. Once you have identified the cause, you can work on potty training your child again with a fresh start.

Patience, consistency, and positive reinforcement are key when potty training any child, but especially when potty training a late starter or a child who is experiencing potty training regression.

10 Potty Training Tips for Success 

If you are potty training your child, here are 10 potty training tips to help you achieve success:

  • Start potty training when your child is ready. Watch for signs that your child is ready to start potty training, such as interest in the potty, staying dry for longer periods of time, or regular bowel movements.
  • Use a potty training method that works for your child. Some children respond well to rewards, while others prefer positive reinforcement. Find a potty training method that works for your child and stick with it.
  • Be consistent. Once you start potty training, be consistent with the potty training routine and rules. This will help your child understand what is expected of them and make potty training easier.
  • Be patient. Potty training can be a long and difficult process, so it is important to be patient. Remember that accidents are common and to be expected.
  • Use positive reinforcement. Encourage your child through the potty training process with positive reinforcement, such as praise, stickers, or small toys.
  • Avoid negative reinforcement. Never punish your child for having an accident. This will only make potty training more difficult and can lead to potty training regression.
  • Have realistic expectations. Potty training is a process, so it is important to have realistic expectations. It may take several weeks or months for your child to be fully potty trained.
  • Be prepared for accidents. Accidents are common, so it is important to be prepared. Always have a change of clothes on hand and be sure to clean up any accidents immediately.
  • Be flexible. Potty training can be unpredictable, so it is important to be flexible. Be prepared to change your potty training plans if necessary.
  1. Seek help if needed. If you are struggling with potty training, seek help from a potty training expert or your child’s doctor. Do not hesitate to ask for help if you need it.

Potty training is a process that takes time, patience, and consistency.

Additional Resources 

Here are some additional resources that may be helpful:

– pottytraining.com

– pottytrainingtips.com

– howtotrainyourchildtopottie.com

– pottytrainingbasics.com

These articles offer potty training tips, advice, and resources!

Final Remarks

Potty training is an important milestone in your child’s development. The process can be different for every child, so it is important to be patient and go at your child’s pace. Knowing when to start potty-training a toddler can be helpful in ensuring success.

Most children are potty trained by age three, but some children may not be fully potty trained until they are five years old or older. If your child shows no interest in potty training by age four, it is important to consult with your pediatrician to rule out any underlying medical conditions that may be causing the delay.

Potty training after age four may be more difficult, but it is still possible to potty train a child after age four with patience and consistency. If you are potty training a late starter, it is important to keep in mind that accidents are common and to be expected. Be patient, consistent, and use positive reinforcement to encourage your child through the potty training process.

What age did you potty train your toddler? Share your tips and tricks in the comments below!

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